BMW BERLIN-MARATHON

Capacity Inaugural Race Largest Field Estimated Spectators Prize Purse
40,000 1974 36,601 finishers (2013) 1 Million $340,000 *

* $64,000 for the male and female champions

 

A group of runners from one of Germany’s most prestigious athletics clubs, SC Charlottenburg, organised the first BERLIN-MARATHON in 1974. It was not until 1981 that the race moved from the Grunewald (a big forest) into the city center of West Berlin. Supported by the three western allied forces (Britain, France and U.S.) it quickly developed into Germany’s biggest and best quality marathon. It was after the Berlin Wall collapsed in November 1989 when a new era started. On September 30, 1990, three days before reunification, the course of the Berlin Marathon led through Brandenburg Gate and both parts of Berlin. In 2001 Naoko Takahashi became the first woman to break the 2:20 barrier in Berlin. The flat and fast loop course then was changed significantly for the 2003 race. Paul Tergat, who ran the world record of 2:04:55, became the first man to cross the new finish line, passing through Brandenburg Gate – the symbol for reunification.

In 2007 and 2008 the Ethiopian world class runner Haile Gebrselassie broke the world record on the streets of Berlin: First to 2:04:26 and just one year later to 2:03:59, going sub 2:04 for the first time ever. In 2011 the, Kenyan Patrick Makau took the World record from Haile by finishing in 2:03:38. Two years later it was fellow Kenyan Wilson Kipsang to break the World record in Berlin by clocking 2:03:23. The BMW BERLIN-MARATHON has developed into one of the world’s best road races. Visit bmw-berlin-marathon.com for more information.

Recent Participation:

Year Finishers Male Female
2006 30,190 24,103 6,087
2007 32,638 26,136 6,502
2008 35,913 28,354 7,429
2009 35,035 27,965 7,070
2010 34,002 26,603 7,399
2011 33,312 25,817 7,495
2012 34,485 26,542 7,943
2013 36,601    

World Records (Men):

2:03:23 – Wilson Kipsang, 2013
2:03:38 – Patrick Makau, 2011
2:03:59 – Haile Gebrselassie, 2008
2:04:26 – Haile Gebrselassie, 2007
2:04:55 – Paul Tergat, 2003
2:06:05 – Ronaldo da Costa, 1998

World Records (Women):

2:19:46 – Naoko Takahashi, 2001
2:20:43 – Tegla Loroupe, 1999
2:34:48 – Christa Vahlensieck, 1977

Course Records:

2:03:23 – Wilson Kipsang, 2013
2:19:12 - Mizuki Noguchi, 2005

Most Victories:

Men: 4 (Haile Gebrselassie, ETH)
Women: 3 (Uta Pippig, GER; Renata Kokowska, POL)

African Records (Men):

2013 – Wilson Kipsang (2:03:23)
2011 – Patrick Makau (2:03:38)
2008 – Haile Gebrselassie (2:03:59)
2007 – Haile Gebrselassie (2:04:26)
2003 – Paul Tergat (2:04:55 )

African Records (Women):

1999 – Tegla Loroupe (2:20:43)

Asian Records (Men):

1999 – Takayuki Inubushi JPN 2. 2:06:57

Asian Records (Women):

2001 – Naoko Takahashi JPN 1. 2:19:46
2005 – Mizuki Noguchi JPN 1. (2:19:12)

European Records (Women):

1977 – Christa Vahlensieck (2:34:48)

Commonwealth Records (Men):

1995 – Sammy Lelei (2:07:02)
2003 – Paul Tergat (2:04:55)

Commonwealth Records (Women):

1999 – Tegla Loroupe (2:20:43)

South-American Records (Men):

1998 – Ronaldo da Costa (2:06:05)

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